More than mindfulness

I have practiced mindfulness meditation for almost 20 years. I started practicing mindfulness meditation way back in 1994, after reading the Vietnamese Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh’s book, Being Peace.

Between 1994 and 2000, my sister and I gave each other Thich Nhat Hanh’s books, and we tried to apply his teachings on mindfulness to our lives. In 2000, my sister and I went on a retreat at Plum Village, the monastery where Thich Nhat Hanh lives and teaches. We were there for several weeks, and our experiences there were life-changing. I’ve written about the retreat in my post: Trying out Zen medicine.

I credit mindfulness meditation with helping me to become healthy again after years of struggling with debilitating flares of inflammatory bowel disease. With mindfulness, I learned to listen to my body and to my intuition in ways that supported my physical and mental health. I also learned how to relate to strong emotions, even if they still take me for a roller-coaster ride at times. Importantly, during some of the most difficult times of my life, I felt the support of the Sangha, the community of mindfulness practitioners.

I am something of a poster-child for how mindfulness can help people to experience less stress, less illness and more joy and freedom in life. But I want to be clear — especially with the upsurge of mindfulness as a panacea for just about every ailment in modern life — it wasn’t just mindfulness that helped me. More

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Walking the line

Today is the last day of Crohn’s and Colitis Awareness Week in the US. So I am writing a post today to raise some awareness about what it is like to live with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). I have been really lucky to have stayed in remission for so long (now 8+ years).

Earlier this week I had a virus in my gut that could have triggered an episode of IBD, as it did almost 13 years ago. I was lucky this time around. Thirteen years ago, I needed to be hospitalized for two weeks because of the flare that the virus brought on in my gut. This week, I recovered my health within just a few days.

I walk on the line between the healthy and the sick. I am in remission, yes, and I can eat many more kinds of foods than I could when I was sick. I can go outside of my home without the fear that I won’t find a bathroom in time. I rarely have pain in my gut anymore, and if I do, it is usually due to gastroparesis, another gastrointestinal condition I have.

I have not been hospitalized for a flare of Crohn’s colitis in over ten years. In these past ten years I have not been confined to my bed for weeks on end nor have I had to worry about malnourishment or elevated liver levels. I can breastfeed my son without worrying about him getting any small dose of immunosuppressants, since I have been off of these meds for almost four years. The fecal calprotectin tests that my doctor orders still show no signs of inflammation in my gut, and I don’t worry about this test, I know what the results will show. I can feel it in my gut.

But those years of illness took a toll on me. More

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